My Maternal 9th. Great Scottish Grandfather, Malcolm Gillecaluim MacLeod, 3rd. Clan Chief

Stornoway Castle, Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Stornoway, Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Name: Malcolm Gillicaluim MacLeod, son of Tormod MacLeod and Christina Fraser

Birth: 1296 on Isle of Skye, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Married: before 1330 on Isle of Skye, Inverness-shire, Scotland to Dorothea Marjorie Campbell, daughter of Sir Neil MacCailean Mor Campbell and Mary Bruce

Children: (5) John “Ian Cier”, Norman “Tormod”, Murdo “Gleneig”, Malcolm, and Christina MacLeod

Malcolm married a daughter of Sir Neil Campbell of Lochawe, [Alexander MacKenzie, in his HISTORY OF THE MACLEODS (p. 12), says that Malcolm married Martha, daughter of Donald, Earl of Mar. It is possible he may have married her as his second wife.] by whom he had issue…. Chief Malcolm, as he advanced in life, became extremely corpulent, and was known as CALUM REAMHAR MATH (Good Stout Malcolm). The MEMORIAL (1767) says that he was called GILLECALUIM CAS REAMHAR (The Stout-legged Malcolm). While on a visit to his kinsman, MacLeod of Lewis, Malcolm died in the Castle of Stornoway, and his body was conveyed to Iona Abbey, where it was buried. His death took place c. 1370. He was succeeded by his eldest son.
SOURCE: Alick Morrison, THE MACLEODS: THE GENEALOGY OF A CLAN, Section IV, Revised Edition, “The MacLeods of Lewis“, Edinburgh, Associated Clan MacLeod Societies, 1974, p. 1. Malcolm (Gillecaluim), [was] ancestor of the MacLeods of Harris, and recipient in the mid-1340’s of a charter of lands in Glenelg from King David II. [The Book of Dunvegan, (I) p. 275; E. W. Robertson, pp. 48, 99, 100.

Died: 1370 in Stornoway Castle, Lewis, Scotland

Iona_Abbey_from_water_Argyllshire_Scotland

Iona Abbey, Iona, Argyll, Scotland

Burial: 1370 in Iona Abbey, Iona, Argyll, Scotland

MALCOLM MACLEOD (aka Malcolmi filii Turmodi McLeid)

Malcolm MacLeod is the son of Tormod MacLeod. He had a charter under the Great Seal of Scotland by which David II, King of Scots, confirms that he has given him two parts of Glenelg in return for his homage and service. The MacLeods of Dunvegan: 39

Evidence from the National Records of Scotland

Undated charter which belongs to the reighn of David II, King of Scots, and therefore before 22 February 1371: Carta Malcolmi filii Turmodi McCleid [Malcolmi McCloyd] de terris de Glennelgy [Glenelge].

[Note] Registrum Magni Sigilli Regum Scotorum. The Register of the Great Seal of Scotland, A.D. 1306-1424. New Edition, to which are added indexes and remains of the Lost Charter Rolls. Edited by John Maitland Thomson, LL.D. (H.M. General Register House, Edinburgh, 1912), Index A, charter number 862 on p.570

2   Undated charter which belongs to the reighn of David II, King of Scots, and therefore before 22 February 1371: To Malcolme son to Tormode McCloyde, twa parts of Glenegle, in vicecomitatu de Inuernes.

[Note] Ibidem, Index B, charter number (4) on p. 570

Note: Index A gives a brief description of the original lost latin charter. Index B gives a brief description of the same charter in English. The Reverend Canon McLeod gave a fuller version of the same charter charter: “Dilecto et fideli nostro Malcolmo MacLeod, filio Tormodi MacLoud, pro homagio et servitio suo, duas partes tenementi de Glenelg viz octo davatas et quinque denariatas terrae cum pertinentiis, infra vice comitatem de Inverness, faciendo nobis et heredibus nostris predictus Malcolmus et heredes sui servitium unius navis triginti et sex remorum quoties super hoc pro nos feuerunt requeriti.” etc. (Printed for the Clan MacLeod Society, 1927), p. 39

Genealogy

The MacLeods of Dunvegan etc. (Printed for the Clan MacLeod Society, 1927), For an account of Malcolm MacLeod, son of Tormod MacLeod, see pp. 39-50

Clans of Scotland

 

My Maternal 8th. Great Scottish Grandfather, John “Ian Cier” MacLeod, 4th. Clan Chief

Dunvegan, Isle of Skye, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Name: John “Ian Cier” MacLeod, son of Malcolm Gillecaluim MacLeod and Dorothea Majorie Campbell

The Chiefs of Clan MacLeod claim descent from Leod, a high-born Norse-Gael who is thought to have lived in the 13th century, but whose ancestors are known from multiple pedigrees at least into the early 12th or late 11th centuries. It is said that the chiefs of the clan have been seated at Dunvegan Castle since the time of Leod, and this on the Isle of Skye where for centuries they were sovereign within their own territories. Wikipedia

Birth: 1330 in Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye, Inverness-shire, Scotland

The following is from https://clanmacleod.org (MacLeodgenealogy.org) and the sources it cites:

BIOGRAPHY: Sir Robert Douglas of Glenbervie, Baronet, THE BARONAGE OF SCOTLAND, Edinburgh, 1798, p. 375. IX. William Macleod fourth baron of that ilk, Herries, &c. who lived in the reign of king Robert II, Šhad issue two sons and one daughter:

1. Malcolm, who died before his father, unmarried.

2. William, who became his father’s heir.

3. His daughter was married to Lauchlan MacLean of Dowart, and had issue.

John died in the beginning of the reign of King Robert III, and was succeeded by his son, William MacLeod.

BIOGRAPHY: Rev. Dr. Donald MacKinnon, MACLEOD CHIEFS OF HARRIS AND DUNVEGAN, Edinburgh, The Clan MacLeod Society, 1969, p. 11. Alick Morrison, East Kilbride, Scotland, 1986.

According to the BANNATYNE MANUSCRIPT, this MacLeod Chief was a ‘most tyrannical and blood-thirsty despot, equally feared by all his vassals and by the members of his own family’. He married an Irish lady of the name of Annie O’Neil, who, it would appear, was as cruel and vindictive as her husband. By her, John had issue…. About the year 1392, Chief John went to Harris to be present at a deer hunt, and was accompanied by the chief men of his clan. After the hunt was over, the Chief returned to Rodel to embark for Dunvegan. When in the act of lifting his foot to step into his galley, his side was pierced by an arrow fired at him from the height above the shore. His followers carried him to the nearby Monastery, where he died that same evening. His body was taken to Iona and buried there. He was succeeded by his surviving son.

fairy-pools-skye-scotland

Fairy Pools, Isle of Skye, Argyllshire, Scotland

Married: about 1360 in Dunvegan, Inverness-shire, Scotland to Annie O’Neil from Ireland

Children: (3) Malcolm, William Cleireach, Miss (Cameron) MacLeod

Isle-of-Harris-Scotland-Postcard-St-Clements-Church

Isle-of-Harris-Scotland-Postcard-St-Clements-Church

Died: 1392 in Rodel, Harris, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Ardchattan Priory - Scotland's Gardens · Argyll Bute Scotland

Burial: 1392 in Isle of Iona, Argyllshire, Scotland

Iona_Abbey_from_water_Argyllshire_Scotland

Iona_Abbey_from_water_Argyllshire_Scotland

Iona (Scottish Gaelic: Ì Chaluim Chille, sometimes simply Ì) is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It is mainly known for Iona Abbey, though there are other buildings on the island.
Island group: Mull
Gaelic name: Ì Chaluim Chille
Population rank: 35
Iona – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Iona

cropped-dunvegan_castle__gardens_scotland.jpg

Dunvegan Castle, Argyllshire, Scotland

Clans of Scotland

Clans of Scotland

My Maternal 10th. Great Scottish Grandfather, Sir Roderick MacLeod, 15th. Chief of Clan MacLeod

Dunvegan Castle and Gardens, Isle of Skye, Scotland

MacLeod Estate, Dunvegan Castle and Gardens, Dunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland

Dunvegan Castle Gardens, Scotland

fairy-pools-skye-scotland

Fairy Pools, Skye, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Iona, Argyll, Scotland
Alternate Name:
 
 
Family Members

    Spouses and Children:

 
1568–1615  •  96XM-SL8
 

 

Marriage: 1592 in Scotland

Children: (13)

Sir Roderick MacLeod 1st Of Talisker  1593–1675  •  LHF7-M9K

John Iain Mor MacLeod 16th Chief  1595–1649  •  L8JP-1D1

Mary Mor MacLeod  1596–Deceased  •  K6SM-GHM

Mary MacLeod 1605–1670  •  L2SJ-X26

Janet Dunvegan MacLeod 1605–Deceased  •  L2SJ-XLD

Sir Norman MacLeod of Berneray 1614–1705  •  LHF7-MHK

Isabel MacLeod  1614–Deceased  •  LHF7-MXV

William MacLeod  1615–1698  •  KZL5-988

Donald MacLeod 1st of Greshornish 1619–1705  •  99Q9-LBP

Janet Macleod  1620–Deceased  •  946X-8HM

Florence (Flora) MacLeod 1626–1726  •  L2SJ-X

Catherine MacLeod  Deceased  •  KZW2-Z46

Margaret MacLeod  Deceased  •  L2SJ-XJG

Dunvegan Castle and Gardens

Dunvegan Castle, Isle of Skye, Scotland

Sir Roderick Macleod of Macleod (1573–1626), also known as Rory Mor, was the 15th chief of Clan MacLeod. His seat as Clan Chief was Dunvegan Castle.
Biography
In 1595 he went to Ireland with 500 of his clan to assist Hugh Roe O’Donnell with his war against the English. Upon his return he became involved in a feud with his Brother-in-law Donald Gorm Og MacDonald, who was Chief of the powerful Clan MacDonald of Sleat. The two clans had fought together in Ireland and had now become enemies when for some reason MacDonald rejected his wife, Sir Roderick’s sister, and became very hostile towards his old allies. After a year of feuding the two Clans finally met in the Battle of Coire Na Creiche and the MacLeods were defeated. This was the last Clan battle on the Isle of Skye.

In December 1597, an act of the Estates was passed that required that all the Chieftains and Landlords of the Highlands and the Western Isles to produce their title-deeds under pain of forfeiture. Roderick ignored the act and a gift of his estates were given to a number of Fife gentlemen for the purpose of colonisation. After these attempts were dealt with he was ultimately successful getting a remission from King James VI of Scotland dated 4 May 1610 for his lands of Harris, Dunvegan and Glengarry.

He married Isabella MacDonald, daughter of the 8th Chief of Clan MacDonald of Glengarry:

Margaret MacLeod of Macleod who married Hector Mor Maclean, 16th Chief
Mary MacLeod of Macleod who married Sir Lachlan Maclean, 1st Baronet
Ian Mor Macleod of Macleod, 16th Chief who married Sybella Mackenzie, daughter of Kenneth Mackenzie, 1st Lord Mackenzie of Kintail and Anne Ross. He died in September 1649.
Sir Norman Macleod of Bernera who married Katherine Macdonald, daughter of Sir James Mor Macdonald, 9th Laird of Sleat, 2nd Baronet and Margaret Mackenzie.
Notes
1573 DOB (Macleod 1938, p. 23)
1626 DOD (lundy 2012, p. page=14694 § 146936 cites Mosley 2003, p. 2529)
a b lundy 2012, p. page=14694 § 146936
Report of the annual meeting. Scottish History Society. 1900. To him succeeded Eachin Mor. He married Margaret eldest Daughter of Roderick Laird of Macleod, but had no issue.
MacLean, John Patterson (1889). A History of the Clan MacLean from Its First Settlement at Duard Castle, in the Isle of Mull, to the Present Period: Including a Genealogical Account of Some of the Principal Families Together with Their Heraldry, Legends, Superstitions, Etc. R. Clarke & Company. Sir Lachlan MacLean was married to Mary, second daughter of Sir Roderick MacLeod of MacLeod, by whom he had issue two sons and three daughters. Hector, his heir and successor, and Allan. His daughter Isabella married Sir Ewen Cameron of Lochiel; Mary married Lachlan MacKinnon, and the youngest daughter, Marian, died young and unmarried.
References
Macleod, R.C. (1938), The Book of Dunvegan, 1, p. 23
Lundy, Darryl (17 June 2012), Sir Roderick Macleod of Macleod, 15th Chief, The Peerage, p. 14694 § 147059, retrieved 2009-04-22 External link in |publisher= (help). Endnotes:
Mosley, Charles (2003), Burke’s Peerage and Baronetage, 2 (107th ed.), Wilmington, Delaware, U.S.A.: Burke’s Peerage (Genealogical Books), p. 2529   The Peerage, source: Wikipedia

My Maternal 14th. Great Scottish Grand Uncle, Torquil MacLeod, 8th. Chief of Lewis

sunny dalmore beach
Dalmore beach on Lewis, Scotland in summer sun

Name: Torquil MacLeod, 8th. Chief of Clan MacLeod of Lewis, son of Roderick

Born: 1458 on Isle of Lewis, Argyll, Scotland

Married: 1498 in Argyll, Scotland to Lady Catherine Campbell, of Argyll

Torquil MacLeod (Scottish Gaelic: Torcall mac Murchaidh, and Torcall MacLeòid) (fl. 14th century) was a Hebridean lord and is today considered to be the founder of the MacLeods of Lewis, who are known in Gaelic as Sìol Torcaill (“seed of Torcall”). He was the son of Murdoch MacLeod, and a great-grandson of Leod, eponymous ancestor of the MacLeods.

Torquil and his uncle, Malcolm, are the first MacLeods chiefs to appear in contemporary records. Their names are recorded as “Torkyll M’Cloyd”, and “Malcolme, son to Tormode M’Cloyde”, in a royal charter of 1343, during the reign of David II (r. 1329–1371), which grants Torquil the lands of Assynt. The eminent 19th-century Scottish scholar W.F. Skene noted that Torquil was not designated “of Lewis” in the charter, nor any other designation. Another 19th-century historian, Donald Gregory, stated that during this era, Torquil would have held Lewis, not from the kings of Scots, but from the lords of the Isles.

According to the 19th century Lewis senachie already mentioned, Torquil was a councillor between the Macaulays and Morrisons—two bitter rival clans—after a battle fought by them near Barvas.

Family

Mid 15th century arms of Torquil’s descendants, the MacLeods of Lewis. The arms are thought to be derived from those of the MacNicols.

Torquil is said to have married Margaret, a MacNicol heiress of Assynt.[8] Torquil was succeeded by his son, Roderick.

source: Wikipedia

Children:

Clan MacLeod
Clann MhicLeòid
Clan member crest badge - Clan Macleod.svg

Crest: A bull’s head cabossed sable, horned Or, between two flags gules, staved at the first
Motto Hold fast
Profile
District Inner HebridesOuter HebridesSutherland
Plant badge Juniper
Chief
Arms of Macleod of Macleod.svg
Hugh Magnus MacLeod of MacLeod

(there is a rival claimant to chiefship)

30th Hereditary Chief Clan MacLeod Chief of the Name and Arms of MacLeod (MacLeòid)
Seat Dunvegan Castle
Torqueil MacLeod of the Isle of Lewis, Scotland Dunvegan Castle

 

The surname MacLeod means ‘son of Leod’. The name Leod is an Anglicization of the Scottish Gaelic name Leòd, which is thought to have been derived from the Old Norse.  Clann means family, while mhic is the genitive of mac, the Gaelic for son, and Leòid is the genitive of Leòd. The whole phrase therefore means The family of the son of Leod.

The Clan MacLeod of Lewis claims its descent from Leod, who according to MacLeod tradition was a younger son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann (r.1229–1237).

However, articles have been published in the Clan MacLeod magazine which suggest an alternative genealogy for Leod, one in which he was not son of Olaf, but a 3rd cousin (some removed) from Magnus the last King of Mann. In these alternative genealogies, using the genealogy of Christina MacLeod, great granddaughter of Leod, who married Hector Reaganach (MacLean/MacLaine). These articles suggest that the relationship to the Kings of Mann was through a female line, that of Helga of the beautiful hair. The dating of Christina’s genealogy and the ability to line it up with known historical facts lend a great deal of authenticity to the claims of the authors.

MacLeod tradition is that Leod, who had possession of Harris and part of Skye, married a daughter of the Norse seneschal of Skye, MacArailt or Harold’s son who held Dunvegan and much of Skye. Tradition stated that Leod’s two sons, Tormod and Torquil, founded the two main branches of the Clan MacLeod, Siol Tormod and Siol Torquil. Torquil was actually a grandson of Tormod; Torquil’s descendants held the lands of the Isle of Lewis until the early seventeenth century when the Mackenzies successfully overthrew the Lewismen, partly with the aid of the Morrisons, and the MacLeods of Harris (Siol Tormod). Younger branches of Siol Torquil held the mainland lands of Assynt and Cadboll longer, and the Isle of Raasay until 1846. Siol Tormod held Harris and Glenelg on the mainland, and also the lands of Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye.

Leod, according to tradition, died around 1280 and was buried on the holy island of Iona, where six successive chiefs of the clan found a last resting-place after him. source: Wikipedia

 

My Maternal 15th. Great Grandfather, William Dubh MacLeod, 7th. Chief of Clan MacLeod

sunny dalmore beach
Dalmore beach on Lewis, Scotland in summer sun

William Dubh MacLeod (Scottish Gaelic: Uilleam Dubh MacLeòid) (c. 1415–1480) is considered to be the seventh chief of Clan MacLeod. He is thought to have been a younger son, yet because of the death of his elder brother, William Dubh succeeded his father, Iain Borb, in the year 1442. William Dubh was an old man when he was killed, leading his clan, at the Battle of Bloody Bay in 1480. He was the last MacLeod chief to be buried on the island of Iona. He was succeeded by his son, Alasdair Crotach.
source: Wikipedia

Name:
Dunvegan_Castle__Gardens_Scotland
Burial:
1480
Iona, Scotland
Iona, seat of Celtic Christianity in Scotland where St. Columba came ashore from Ireland to establish his monastery in sixth century, on the island at the western end of the Isle of Mull. Still a working religious center where pilgrims come by the thousands to follow the ways of Celtic Christianity. The Celtic Cross has stood outside the church for over 1,000 years.
Iona is a small island in the Inner Hebrides off the Ross of Mull on the western coast of Scotland. It was a centre of Gaelic monasticism for four centuries and is today known for its relative tranquility and natural environment. Wikipedia
 
Area: 3.386 mi²
Sovereign state: United Kingdom
Pronunciation: (listen)
Largest settlement: Baile Mór

 

My Maternal 14th. Great Scottish Grandfather, Alexander Alisdair Crotach MacLeod, 8th. Chief of Clan MacLeod

cropped-dunvegan_castle__gardens_scotland.jpg

Name: Alexander Alisdair Crotach MacLeod, son of William Dubh MacLeod, 8th. Chief of Clan MacLeod and Lady Margaret Cameron, of Lochiel, Scotland

Born: 1455 in Dunvegan, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Married: about 1504 in Scotland

Children: Anne MacLeod

Screenshot (407)

Died: 1547 in Harris, Inverness-shire, Scotland

Alasdair Crotach MacLeod (Scottish Gaelic: Alasdair Crotach MacLeòid) (1450 – 1547) is considered to be the eighth chief of Scottish Clan MacLeod. He was the son of the seventh chief William Dubh and succeeded his father in 1480, following William Dubh’s death at the Battle of Bloody Bay. He was the first MacLeod chief not to be buried on the island of Iona. The Scottish Gaelic word crotach means “humpbacked” and the nickname refers to wounds he received during battle which crippled him the rest of his life. Alasdair Crotach’s tomb is one of the most magnificently carved tombs of its era in Scotland. He was succeeded by his son, William. source: Wikipedia

Scotland

Scotland

My Maternal 13th. Great Scottish Grandmother, Anne (MacLeod) MacDougall

Scotland

Scotland

Dunvegan_Castle__Gardens_Scotland

Dunvegan Castle, Dunvegan, Isle of Skye, Scotland

Dunvegan Castle is located 1 mile to the north of Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye, off the west coast of Scotland. It is the seat of the MacLeod of MacLeod, chief of the Clan MacLeod. Address: MacLeod Estate, Dunvegan House, Dunvegan, Isle of Skye IV55 8WF, United Kingdom  Hours: Open today · 10AM–5:30PM Founded: 13th-19th centuryOwner: Hugh Magnus MacLeod of MacLeod Phone: +44 1470 521206.  Did you know: Any visit to the Isle of Skye is incomplete without savouring the wealth of history and clan legend on offer at 5* Dunvegan Castle & Gardens. visitscotland.com 

Clan MacLeod (/ˌklæn mᵻˈklaʊd/; Scottish Gaelic: Clann MhicLeòid; [ˈkʰl̪ˠau̯n̪ˠ viçkʲˈʎɔːhtʲ]) is a Highland Scottish clan associated with the Isle of Skye. There are two main branches of the clan: the MacLeods of Harris and Dunvegan, whose chief is MacLeod of MacLeod, are known in Gaelic as Sìol Tormoid (“seed of Tormod”); the Clan MacLeod of Lewis and Raasay, whose chief is Macleod of The Lewes (Scottish Gaelic: Mac Ghille Chaluim),[1] are known in Gaelic as Sìol Torcaill (“seed of Torcall”). Both branches claim descent from Leòd, who lived in the 13th century. source: Wikipedia

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Anne MacLeod, daughter of Alexander Alisdar Crotach MacLeod, 8th. Chief of Clan MacLeod, and Lady Margaret Cameron of Lochiel.

sunny dalmore beach

Dalmore Beach, Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Lewis is the northern part of Lewis and Harris, the largest island of the Western Isles or Outer Hebrides. The total area of Lewis is 683 square miles.
Area: 859 mi²
Police: Scottish
Sovereign state: United Kingdom  source: Wikipedia

Born: 1504 in Isle of Lewis, Scotland

Married: about 1526 in Argyllshire, Scotland to John Iain D. Macdougall, 19th. Chief of Clan Macdougall

Children: John Iain, Dugall, Duncan, and Moire Macdougall

Death: about 1574 in Skye Isle, Invernes-shire, Scotland

Screenshot (406)

Beautiful scenery! I never knew that my ancestors were Scottish, and my maternal 13th. great grandmother, Anne MacLeod MacDougall was from here.

 

 

 

 

 

My Maternal Ancestors, Clan MacLeod of Dunvegan and Lorn, Scotland

Screenshot (407)

Dunvegan_Castle__Gardens_Scotland

Dunvegan Castle, seat of the chiefs of the Clan MacLeod for over 800 years

Origins

The surname MacLeod means ‘son of Leod’. The name Leod is an Anglicization of the Scottish Gaelic name Leòd, which is thought to have been derived from the Old Norse. Clann means family, while mhic is the genitive of mac, the Gaelic for son, and Leòid is the genitive of Leòd. The whole phrase therefore means The family of the son of Leod.

The Clan MacLeod of Lewis claims its descent from Leod, who according to MacLeod tradition was a younger son of Olaf the Black, King of Mann (r.1229–1237). However, articles have been published in the Clan MacLeod magazine which suggest an alternative genealogy for Leod, one in which he was not son of Olaf, but a 3rd cousin (some removed) from Magnus the last King of Mann.

In these alternative genealogies, using the genealogy of Christina MacLeod, great granddaughter of Leod, who married Hector Reaganach (McLean/McLaine) these articles suggest that the relationship to the Kings of Mann was through a female line, that of Helga of the beautiful hair. The dating of Christina’s genealogy and the ability to line it up with known historical facts lend a great deal of authenticity to the claims of the authors.

MacLeod tradition is that Leod who had possession of Harris and part of Skye, married a daughter of the Norse seneschal of Skye, MacArailt or Harold’s son who held Dunvegan and much of Skye.

Tradition stated that Leod’s two sons, Tormod and Torquil, founded the two main branches of the Clan MacLeod, Siol Tormod and Siol Torquil. Torquil was actually a grandson of Tormod; Torquil’s descendants held the lands of the Isle of Lewis until the early seventeenth century when the Mackenzies successfully overthrew the Lewismen, partly with the aid of the Morrisons, and the MacLeods of Harris (Siol Tormod).

Younger branches of Siol Torquil held the mainland lands of Assynt and Cadboll longer, and the Isle of Raasay until 1846. Siol Tormod held Harris and Glenelg on the mainland, and also the lands of Dunvegan on the Isle of Skye. Leod, according to tradition, died around 1280 and was buried on the holy island of Iona, where six successive chiefs of the clan found a last resting-place after him. source: Wikipedia, Clan MacLeod

Dunvegan_Castle, Isle of Skye, Argyllshire, Scotland

Dunvegan_Castle, Isle of Skye, Argyllshire, Scotland

Dunvegan Castle, Scotland

Dunvegan Castle and Gardens

Dunvegan Castle and Gardens, Dunvegan, Argyllshire, Scotland